Funding Programs (Federal)

Assisted Living Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100035250/1533317440443

About: This program provides funding for non-medical, social support services to seniors, adults with chronic illness, and children and adults with disabilities (mental and physical) on reserve to help them maintain their independence. Major components include: in-home care, adult foster care, institutional care (for those needing personal non-medical 24-hour care).

Qualifications:

First Nations, provinces and Yukon receive funding on an annual basis as part of agreements negotiated between the federal, provincial and Yukon governments.

First Nations, provinces and Yukon then provide assisted living services to eligible recipients. Individuals who believe they may be eligible to receive these services should contact their band’s assisted living coordinator or their band manager to arrange an assessment by a health care provider.

Any individual residing on-reserve, or ordinarily resident on-reserve, who has been formally assessed by a health care provider (in the provinces or Yukon) as requiring social support services.

Individuals must not have the means to obtain such services themselves, or access to other sources of support from the federal, provincial or Yukon governments.

Deadline: Annual deadlines vary

How to apply:

Service-provider:

The department provides funds annually to First Nations through their core funding agreements.

Individuals: ordinarily resident* on-reserve and wish to find out if you are eligible to receive assisted-living services such as in-home care, adult foster care and institutional care under the Assisted Living Program, contact your band’s assisted living coordinator or your band’s manager.

*Ordinarily resident on-reserve means that individuals live on-reserve and do not maintain a primary residence off-reserve. Individuals who are off-reserve to obtain care not available on-reserve are considered ordinarily resident on-reserve, and eligible for funding through the Assisted Living Program, if all eligibility criteria are met.

 

Band Support Funding***

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100013825/1100100013826

About:

The program provides funds in the form of a grant and not a contribution agreement. Grants allow bands the flexibility to distribute funds according to their individual needs and priorities in meeting the cost of local government.

Program funding is distributed to First Nations based on a funding formula that takes into account a community’s size and services it manages. Grants focus on costs related to the administration of programs and services funded by the department.

The maximum funding available for each band is determined by the following seven components:

  • population according to place of residence (on-reserve and off-reserve population) as of December 31 of each year
  • total number of cases per month in the income security program
  • number and value of federal, provincial and territorial agreements
  • value of major capital projects
  • number of specialists required to deliver the services funded by INAC
  • type and value of the basic services funded by INAC (such as education, income support, economic development, infrastructure, band management)
  • geographic index (location based on remoteness and environmental conditions)

Qualifications:

Any First Nation (“Indian band” as defined by the Indian Act, RSC, 1985) whether or not they are located on a reserve.

Deadline:  Varies by region between January and March 31 of each year.

How to apply:

Recipients must complete an annual application form. To receive an increase in funding, renew a funding agreement or manage a new program, a new application form must be submitted.

When applying, use the First Nation Application for Indian Government Support Programs and follow the instructions. Please consult the Band Support Funding Program Policy for more information.

Submit a completed application to your regional office.

The department will review applications to determine the maximum eligible funding level for the new fiscal year.

Band Support Funding Application:

 

 

Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100016395/1533641696528

About: The Capital Facilities and Maintenance (CFM) program within Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) is the main pillar of the Government of Canada’s effort to support community infrastructure for First Nations on reserve.

The program’s funding, which totals over $1 billion per year, is invested in four main areas: housing, education, water and wastewater systems, and other infrastructure (roads and bridges, fire protection, electrification, community facilities, etc.).

The main objectives of the CFM program are to make investments that:

  • maximize the life cycle of physical assets;
  • mitigate health and safety risks;
  • ensure assets meet applicable codes and standards; and
  • ensure assets are managed in a cost-effective and efficient manner.

The program has three funding streams – operations and maintenance (O&M), minor capital (for projects under $1.5 million) and major capital (for projects over $1.5 million).

Major capital projects are subject to the department’s national priority ranking framework. The framework’s priorities are:

  1. Protection of health and safety and assets (assets require upgrading or replacement to meet appropriate standards);
  2. Health and safety improvements (upgrades of existing assets, new construction/acquisition projects to mitigate an identified significant risk to health and safety);
  3. Recapitalization/major maintenance (extend the useful operating life of a facility or asset, or maintain the original service level of the asset); and
  4. Growth (anticipated community growth requiring new housing, roads, schools, community buildings, etc.).

The CFM program’s funding is managed through regional five-year capital plans, which list specific projects the region plans to undertake, subject to the availability of funding. It is made up of projects identified by First Nations in their capital plans and other specific projects that First Nations identify throughout the year. INAC’s National Capital Management Board and Regional Investment Management Boards oversee CFM program investments.

The Department prioritizes spending to get the money where it is needed most. This includes reviews of our capital budget on an ongoing basis to ensure that health and safety concerns are addressed within available funding levels.

The program has been under considerable pressure for many years. Key pressures have included:

  • rising construction costs, particularly in Western Canada;
  • rising fuel costs, driving project costs and operations costs;
  • increasing operations and maintenance costs, which require a larger share of program funding;
  • premature rust-out of assets, often due to a lack of regular maintenance and limited local capacity to operate; and
  • infrastructure funding diverted to cover price and volume increases in social and education costs.

In assessing the best way to respond to these pressures, and most effectively allocate our funds we need to carry out detailed work to assess current state of community infrastructure and determine how best to target our investments.

At the same time, many worthwhile projects are deferred due to the need to fund projects with more immediate health and safety impacts. To ensure that we are spending our resources where they are needed most, we rely on our ranking framework to allocate resources to the highest priorities.

 

Circuit Rider Training Program**

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1313424571273/1313424692733

About:

Indigenous Services Canada’s Circuit Rider Training Program provides First Nation operators with hands-on training on how to operate, service and maintain the water and wastewater systems in their community, so that First Nations communities have safe access to drinking water. It is a key component of the Government of Canada’s First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan.

Indigenous Services Canada helps First Nation communities build and retain the capacity to operate, service and maintain their water and wastewater systems.

The Circuit Rider Training Program is a long-term capacity building program that provides training and mentoring services to operators of First Nations drinking water systems and wastewater systems. Qualified experts rotate through a circuit of First Nations communities, training the people responsible for operating, monitoring and maintaining drinking water and wastewater systems. These experts assist First Nations operators in obtaining and maintaining their certification and may also provide advice to chiefs and councils on how to develop and maintain their own safe water systems.

Qualifications:

Any First Nations band that operates a public drinking water system or wastewater system is automatically enrolled in this program.

Deadlines: No deadlines

How to apply:

First Nations do not need to apply for this program. Any band that operates a public drinking water system or wastewater system is enrolled in the program automatically.

 

Community Opportunity Readiness***

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100033414/1100100033415

About: The Community Opportunity Readiness Program addresses the financial needs of Aboriginal communities when they are in pursuit of, and wish to participate in, an economic opportunity. The program is a consolidation of the former community economic opportunities program, the major projects investment fund, and the community-based components of the Aboriginal business development program.

Qualifications:

  • First Nation and Inuit communities and their governments, including Tribal Councils
  • Organizations and associations controlled by First Nation and Inuit communities, except those with charitable or religious purposes
  • Non-Aboriginal organizations and associations (except those with charitable or religious purposes) that plan to provide economic development services for the benefit of First Nation and Inuit communities

Eligible Activities:

  • support to pursue economic opportunities and attract private sector funding, such as feasibility studies, marketing, advertising and promotion, planning, negotiations, legal, land surveys, and appraisals
  • support for community-owned businesses where there is an equity gap, such as for business advisory services and training, commercial development, and market development
  • community economic infrastructure development related to business development (but not related to a specific eligible business)

 

How to apply:

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1395759843966/1395760082967

Your application must be complete and in a level of detail appropriate to the level of funding being sought. Applicants may submit a brief Statement of Intent prior to submitting a full application so the Department may determine whether the project meets program criteria and advise on the development of the full application.

Required project information may include:

  1. Full name, address, phone number, and description of the applicant.
  2. Information on the applicant’s financial situation.
  3. A description of the applicant’s management and organizational capacity.
  4. A detailed description of the proposed project and activities to be undertaken, including:
    • Project description
    • Project objectives
    • Project timelines
    • Project scope
    • Project deliverables
  5. Relevant documentation related to any partnership agreements or commitments.
  6. A cost forecast of the project, including:
    • Details of financing from all sources
    • Uses of funds
    • Identification and justification of costs
    • Identification of other sources of funding, including applicant equity, commercial financing, and other sources of government funding
  7. Project organizational structure
  8. Anticipated economic benefits of the project, such as:
    • Expected outcomes
    • Proposed performance measures to be used at the end of the project to assess community economic benefits
    • Where appropriate:
      • Compliance with laws and regulations
      • Environmental effects and proposed mitigation measures
      • Land tenure requirements
      • Operating, maintenance and repair plan

Community Opportunities Readiness Program (CORP) Application:

 

Contaminated Sites Management Program

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100034640/1100100034641

About: The Indian and Inuit Affairs Program (IIAP) of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), has provided financial assistance to assess and remediate environmentally contaminated sites on reserve lands and other lands under its custodial responsibility since 1992. These sites are being managed under the department’s Contaminated Sites Management Program (CSMP) to determine the location and severity of contaminated sites on inhabited reserves. When these sites pose a risk to human and environmental health and safety, they are remediated on a priority basis. The program helps meet the legal obligations of AANDC under applicable federal and provincial legislation.

Program History / Background:

The CSMP is a multi-phased national initiative to identify and document environmental problems on over 800 inhabited reserves. This effort began in June 1992 under the Environmental Issues Inventory and Remediation Plan (EIIRP) until 2003 when the CSMP was initiated to continue the assessment and remediation of contaminated sites on reserve lands. The increased focus of the CSMP on the remediation of contaminated sites will help to improve the living conditions on reserves and reduce crown liabilities.

The key stakeholders are AANDC (as a trustee of Crown lands and assets on reserves with responsibility for administering the Indian Act) and First Nations (as occupants of the reserves and as individual certificate of possession holders). Secondary stakeholders include other federal departments, namely Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans, and Health Canada. These departments are responsible for ensuring compliance with legislation under their jurisdiction which affects Crown lands. Provincial ministries and municipalities are stakeholders in that they are responsible for preventing pollution and contamination within their jurisdictions and on federal Crown lands, which includes reserves and lands adjacent to reserve lands. (Provincial environmental laws, regulations and standards vary and do not generally apply on reserves.) The Canadian public and special interest groups also become involved as stakeholders.

Description of Operations:

In order to maintain an accurate and up to date list of contaminated sites, a contaminated sites module was developed in the Environmental Stewardship Strategy Information Management System (ESSIMS). ESSIMS is a multi-component information management system developed and maintained by the department, dealing with on reserve environmental issues with extensive cross checking among its component sub-systems. The contaminated sites module is a valuable tool that stores information on all identified contaminated sites on reserves. It is integral to the management and tracking of contaminated sites management processes as well as providing data for reporting requirements. The responsibility of the site by site management of contaminated sites and the accuracy of the associated data in ESSIMS is the responsibility of the regions.

To determine the extent and severity of any contaminated site in terms of its overall risk, the regions use the National Classification System for Contaminated Sites. AANDC will continue to manage contaminated sites following federal government policies, guidelines and standards – including those from the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment and the Canadian Standards Association.

 

Education Partnerships Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100033760/1543408975080

About:

The Education Partnerships Program (EPP) promotes collaboration between First Nations, provinces, Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) and other stakeholders and supports the capacity development of First Nations organizations to deliver education including establishing education systems.

It has two distinct components:

  1. Partnership: This component supports the establishment and the advancement of formal tripartite partnership arrangements that aim to:
    • share expertise and resources
    • assist in the development of practical working relationships between First Nations and provincial officials and educators, to ensure supports are in place for all First Nations students
    • open the way to better coordination and transition between First Nations and provincial systems

The result will be concrete benefits for the students, teachers and administrators involved, which should lead to improved educational outcomes for First Nations students.

  1. Structural Readiness: This component supports capacity and governance development through activities that build the capacity of First Nations organizations to:
    • strengthen their organization
    • cover start-up costs for First Nations school boards
    • support the conclusion of agreements to allow for the operation of on-reserve schools by provincial school boards

A third component, Regional Implementation is being contemplated based on the Memorandum to Cabinet that was recently co-developed with First Nations. It aims at fundamentally improving the way ISC funds elementary and secondary education, while supporting regional and local diversity and implementing the principle of First Nations control of First Nations education.

This new component will provide support for:

  • the delivery of information sessions
  • the establishment of regional technical tables
  • other activities associated with implementing the new formula-based funding approach
  • the development of regional education agreements

It will use the EPP Data Collection Instrument; however, it is not part of the current EPP call for proposals.

More information will be available on this web page by the spring of 2019 including details on the application process, eligibility criteria and guidelines. Until then, for more information about opportunities to participate in information sessions, technical tables or other activities supporting regional implementation of the new policy framework, please contact your ISC regional office.

While both the Partnership and the Structural Readiness components of EPP use the same proposal template, each component has different eligibility criteria and guidelines and must be accessed via a separate proposal. You can apply for the Structural Readiness component without having a tripartite agreement.

Proposals for both the Partnership and the Structural Readiness components will only be accepted for one year and funding will be approved for one year only.

Structural Readiness projects can only be submitted through this program.

Qualification:

Applicants may only submit a one-year proposal for 2019-20. Organizations that submitted a two-year Partnership or Structural Readiness (or both) proposal in 2018-19 must re-submit a Partnership or Structural readiness (or both) proposal in 2019-20 using the 2019-20 Data Collection Instrument (DCI). The 2019-20 proposal may include the same activities as originally submitted in 2018-19, or may incorporate new or updated activities.

Deadline: The deadline to submit a proposal is December 12, 2018 at 11:59 pm Eastern Time.

How to apply:

For the purpose of this call for proposals, the existing Terms and Conditions will apply. Although the EPP is set to expire on March 31, 2020, a process is underway to ensure the sustainability of the program beyond 2020. In collaboration with First Nations partners, this process may result in revisions to the Terms and Conditions.

While both components use the same proposal template, each component has different eligibility criteria and guidelines. You must provide a separate proposal for each component.

The template is available through the ISC Services Portal. If you do not have access to the portal, contact your regional office.

Education Partnerships Program Proposal (PAW# 1775522):

IN PROGRESS

 

Elementary and Secondary Education Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1450708959037/1531319458607

About: The Elementary and Secondary Education Program aims to help eligible students living on reserve reach similar educational outcomes to other Canadian students in the same province. The program supports First Nations students to progress academically, graduate and contribute to their individual, family and community well-being.

Qualification: Funding is given directly to band councils, or to organizations designated by band councils, based on the number of students listed in the Nominal Roll.

Deadline: To be included on the Nominal Roll, a student must be eligible, registered for school, and be in regular attendance on the last school day of September in a school year.

How to apply:

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1519328793522/1531924835824#chp6_1

 

Emergency Management Assistance Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1534954090122/1535120506707

About:

In partnership with First Nation communities, provincial and territorial governments and non-government organizations, Indigenous Services Canada’s Emergency Management Assistance Program (EMAP) helps communities on reserve access emergency assistance services.

EMAP provides funding to First Nations communities so they can build resiliency, prepare for natural or human-caused hazards and respond to them using the four pillars of emergency management:

  1. mitigation
  2. preparedness
  3. response
  4. recovery

EMAP aims to be:

  • flexible
  • culturally sensitive
  • responsive to the unique strengths and customs of First Nation communities
  • adaptive to the evolving challenges resulting from emergency events

The program also provides funding to provinces, territories and non-government organizations to support on-reserve emergency management.

Response and recovery

When emergency response and recovery needs go beyond the capacity of the individual citizens and First Nations or tribal councils, EMAP can help.

EMAP reimburses response and recovery activities due to emergencies, helping the community recover in a timely, durable and holistic way. Eligible emergencies include ongoing or imminent:

  • wildfire
  • flood
  • storm
  • earthquake
  • accident
  • pollution

 

Qualification: To be eligible for funding under the Emergency Management Assistance Program, the emergency event must have impacted, or the proposed project must directly support, First Nations located on:

  • a reserve, as defined in s. 2 (1) of the Indian Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. I-5
  • lands set aside in Yukon as per Cabinet Directive (Circular No. 27) entitled Procedure for Reserving Land in the Yukon and Northwest Territories (1955)
  • lands formerly defined as a reserve or lands set aside which now form part of modern treaty settlement lands

Deadlines: N/A

How to apply: Contact local regional office

Emergency Management Non-Structural Mitigation and Preparedness Program Application (PAW# 6978382)

First Nation Adapt Program

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1481305681144/1481305709311

About: This program provides funding to First Nation communities located below the 60th parallel to assess and respond to climate change impacts on community infrastructure and emergency management.

Qualifications:

  • First Nation communities
  • band or tribal councils
  • Indigenous organizations

Deadlines: N/A

How to apply:

  1. Review the program guidelinesand the budget spreadsheet
  2. Contact the program to discuss a potential project idea
  3. Seek and confirm community support for your project with a band council resolution or other proof of community support
  4. Complete a 3 to 5 page project proposal as described in the guidelines, as well as the budget spreadsheet(MS Excel)
  5. Submit the project proposal, budget spreadsheet, and band council resolution to adaptation.aandc@canada.ca

Project description guidelines

Please ensure your project description (3-5 pages) contains the following content areas.

  1. Title page 
    Include project title, community(s) involved in the project with contact information (name, email address, telephone number).
  2. Description of community concerns
    Tell the story of your community’s climate change concerns and issues. In your description, be sure to include how your community’s public buildings, services, facilities, and roads appear to be at risk to climate impacts, e.g., flooding, wildfires, etc. and how this affects the community. It is most important to specifically indicate what your project will accomplish in terms of improving community resiliency to climate impacts.
  3. Proponent eligibility
    Describe how you are eligible for funding (First Nation community, band or tribal council, Indigenous organization, etc.).
  4. Adaptation project type
    Outline what type of adaptation project is being undertaken. Valid project types include risk assessment, floodplain mapping, adaptation planning, and cost-benefit analysis. Projects need not include all project types.
  5. Climate impact priority area
    Clearly state how your project will address impacts to community infrastructure or emergency management from one or more of the following climate impact areas: inland flooding, drought, wildfires, sea level rise and coastal erosion, winter road failures, or impacts on fisheries.
  6. Proposed methodology and outcome of the project
    The methodology demonstrates how the proponent will address the goals of the project by outlining clear steps in achieving the project results. This is the most important section of the project proposal, be sure to include a detailed description of all the activities that you are planning to undertake. This section should identify how the community will be involved in the project and who will be working on it. Many projects include the hiring of a climate change coordinator to lead the work. The First Nation Adapt team can provide assistance on the development of a methodology if needed. Please contact us to discuss tools, best practices, and potential partners.
  7. Community agreement
    Community support for the project must be demonstrated, through a signed Band Council Resolution or other proof of community support.
  8. Budget and work plan
    First Nation Adapt will provide assistance by supplying the required budget template.

 

First Nation and Inuit Cultural Education Centres Program

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1481305681144/1481305709311

About: This program supports First Nations and Inuit communities in expressing, preserving, developing, revitalizing and promoting their culture, language and heritage, through the creation and operation of First Nations and Inuit cultural education centres.

The goal of the program is to:

  • revive traditional cultural skills among First Nations and Inuit people
  • develop current cultural skills among First Nations and Inuit people
  • develop knowledge and use of traditional languages among First Nations and Inuit people
  • promote cross-cultural awareness between Indigenous and non-Indigenous educational programs and institutions

Qualification: First Nations and Inuit cultural education centres, member centres supported under the First Nation Confederacy of Cultural Education Centres, and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami. Inuit cultural education centres and the Inuit Tapirrit Kanatami may also be eligible to apply for the Inuit Cultural Education Centres Grant Program.

Deadline: The 2018-2019 call for proposals is now closed. Proposals were accepted until May 7, 2018 at 11:59 pm. Eastern Time.

How to apply: Applicants must submit a detailed proposal clearly indicating how the proposed project will meet the goals of the program and respond to educational and community needs. The level of funding for successful proposals is determined on a case-by-case basis and depends on the number of proposals submitted and total available funding.

Guideline:

  1. Introduction

The First Nation and Inuit Cultural Education Centres Program (FNICECP) provides funding to First Nation and Inuit Cultural Education Centres on reserves or Inuit settlement regions to support the development and promotion of First Nations and Inuit cultural heritage.

  1. Objective

The objective of the FNICECP is to support First Nation and Inuit communities in expressing, preserving, developing, revitalizing and promoting their culture, language and heritage, through the establishment and operation of First Nation and Inuit cultural education centres. It also ensures that culturally relevant programming and services are available to First Nation and Inuit students through cultural education centres. It will also contribute to an enhanced cultural environment and understanding within communities.

  1. Expected results

The program expected results are:

  • Revived traditional cultural skills among First Nations and Inuit people;
  • Developed contemporary cultural skills among First Nations and Inuit people;
  • First Nation and Inuit peoples’ knowledge and use of their traditional languages;
  • Cross-cultural awareness in mainstream educational programs and institutions.
  1. Activities

Key activities supported by the program include:

  • Conduct and/or facilitate research into First Nation and Inuit heritage and culture;
  • Develop or expand on First Nation or Inuit linguistic learning resources;
  • Develop or expand on First Nation or Inuit learning resources other than linguistic learning resources;
  • Develop and/or test culturally oriented educational curricula, methods and materials for use by established and other programs in schools;
  • Develop and/or collect educational curricula for use by communities or the public;
  • Develop new and more accurate information about First Nation or Inuit heritage, including historical material;
  • Support a community cultural event or traditional ceremony;
  • Support the operation of a community museum, library or gallery;
  • Coordinate cultural education workshops;
  • Support an activity which helps improve opportunities for the public to become knowledgeable about and sensitive to the historical and contemporary role of First Nation and Inuit people in Canada;
  • Support an activity which helps to revive traditional skills;
  • Support an activity which helps to develop contemporary cultural skills; and
  • Manage proposal-based programs (for recipients who are funding delivery organizations for individual projects).
  1. Eligible Recipients

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) directly funds First Nation and Inuit cultural education centres and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami. ISC also funds the First Nations Confederacy of Cultural Education Centres, who manages and administers FNICECP funds for a majority of First Nation Cultural Education Centres.

  1. Proposal Process

All funding for the FNICECP will be based on proposals approved by ISC. Applicants must submit detailed proposals for all the activities to be undertaken over the course of the agreement, clearly stating how the proposed activities will further the objectives, and respond to educational and community needs and expected results of this program.

Submission of Proposals

Only proposals submitted in the electronic proposal form issued by ISC will be considered for assessment. Refer to the proposal form and the attached instructions for application details. Incomplete proposals will be returned to applicants.

The information required in the proposal is available in the Reporting Guide. Recipients who have access to the ISC Services Portal can access the proposal form by opening a session on the Portal. If you do not have access to the Portal, contact your regional office, or if you are a national recipient, write to aadnc.education-education.aandc@canada.ca.

Details on the 2018-2019 call for proposal and the application process can be found in the Call for proposals page.

Assessment Criteria

All proposals will be assessed by the following criteria:

  • Capability:The experience and capacity of the recipient (and identified project leader, where applicable) to manage the implementation of activities within their proposal successfully and complete the project/initiative in a timely manner;
  • Consultation and Commitment:The extent to which the proposal has the support of relevant organizations and/or communities;
  • Implementation Activities:The extent to which the proposal aligns with eligible activities and meets program objectives. The assessment process will consider timelines, cost-effectiveness, and the degree to which the activities will result in the expected outcomes;
  • Project Management:How the initiative/project will be managed, including project governance, management of program scope, human resources, risk management, deliverables, and project monitoring, control and reporting; and
  • Project Costs:A demonstration of a realistic assessment of estimated total costs and a justification of the level of funding required.

Any cultural education centre that has previously received funding from the FNICECP must report on how that funding met the commitments in their funding agreement and concretely addressed the approved proposal objectives and expected results of the program.

Note: Meeting these criteria does not guarantee funding from the FNICECP program.

Review and Approval of Proposals

ISC regional or headquarters staff will review and approve proposals. A written response will be sent to applicants to confirm whether, or not, their proposal has been approved for funding.

The First Nations Confederacy of Cultural Education Centres (FNCCEC) will review and approve proposals for recipients funded by them.

  1. Eligible Expenditures

Eligible expenditures include, but are not limited to:

  • Salaries;
  • Printing and publishing costs;
  • Materials and Supplies;
  • Elders/Guest speakers;
  • Professional Services/Consulting Fees (including communications consulting and business services);
  • Facility Rental (including equipment rentals, conference and meeting rooms);
  • Travel within Canada;
    Note for recipients:Travel expenses are to be claimed at actual cost, but cannot exceed Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s guidelines as specified in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s Travel Directive in effect at the time of travel. Expenses which exceed the rates set for in the Directive are not eligible and will not be paid.
  • Administration costs not exceeding 10% (see note below):
    • Telephone/fax/internet connection;
    • Postage/courier;
    • Photocopying;
    • Costs associated with ensuring that personal information is appropriately managed and safeguarded during its collection, retention, use, disclosure, and disposal;
    • Bookkeeping; and/or
    • Audit, if required, (not to exceed $5,000);
  • Other (Detailed explanation required).

Note: Administration Costs must not exceed 10% of the sub-total amount requested before administration costs. The program’s Data Collection Instrument (DCI) will automatically calculate the amount.

Further distribution of funds by ISC’s funding recipients: When a funding recipient further transfers, to a Third Party, funds that were received under this program, the 10% allowed for administration costs must be divided between the parties, as agreed to between the parties. The total administration costs retained by all parties must not exceed 10% of the sub-total amount requested before administration costs.

  1. Ineligible Expenditures

Ineligible expenditures include, but are not limited to:

  • Capital construction and renovation;
  • Purchase of land or buildings;
  • Stipends, allowances, honoraria for attendance in a course/activity;
  • Contingency/miscellaneous fees;
  • Deficit recovery;
  • Interest or other bank charges;
  • Amortisation expenses; and
  1. Maximum Program Contribution

This program is proposal-driven and the level of funding is determined on a case-by-case basis, limited overall by total available funding and the number of proposals submitted.

  1. Funding

10.1 Funding approaches

Transfer payments to funding recipients can be made using Contribution funding of different types or using Grant funding, depending on the eligibility of the recipient and depending of the program, service or activity to be delivered. Your ISC regional officer can inform you about eligibility for these different funding approaches as well as of the delivery requirements related to each of them. The funding approach used to transfer the funds will be identified in the recipient’s signed funding agreement.

Consistent with the Government of Canada’s intention to provide additional flexibility to First Nation recipients to carry over funds, most funding approaches include, to different levels, carry over provisions and redirection of funds provisions. For details on the different levels of flexibility, see the Funding approaches page on ISC’s website.

  1. Monitoring and Accountability

Funding recipients must deliver the programs in accordance with the provisions of their funding agreement and the program delivery requirements outlined in these National Program Guidelines while also ensuring that the necessary management controls are in place to manage funding and monitor activities. Funding recipients are required to exercise due diligence when approving expenditures and must ensure that such expenditures are in accordance with the eligible expenditures set out in these National Program Guidelines.

ISC is committed to providing assistance to recipients in order for them to effectively carry out obligations under these National Program Guidelines and funding agreements. Regional offices and other departmental contacts are available to answer questions and provide guidance related to ISC programs and funding.

To ensure that program delivery requirements are being met, that funds are expended on the intended purposes, and that ISC’s accountability to Parliament is being met, activities including audits, evaluations, as well as desk and on-site compliance reviews will be conducted with all funding recipients.

  • The Department’s collection and use of personal information and other records for the purposes of program compliance reviews will be limited to what is necessary to ensure program delivery requirements are met.
  • The Department is responsible for all information and records in its possession. The confidentiality of the information will be managed by ISC in accordance with the Privacy Act and other related policies on privacy. Recipients are responsible for the protection of personal information per the privacy legislation, regulations and/or policies that govern them up to the point that it is transferred to ISC.
  1. Reporting Requirements

The reporting requirements (program and financial reports) are listed in the recipient’s funding agreement, and details on these requirements are available in the Reporting Guide. Recipients are responsible for ensuring that reporting requirements are met and reports are accurate and submitted on or before the established due dates. Recipients who have access to the ISC Services Portal can access the reporting forms by opening a session on the Portal. If you do not have access to the Portal, contact your regional office, or if you are a national recipient, write to aadnc.education-education.aandc@canada.ca.

  1. Contact Information

For further program information please visit the First Nation and Inuit Cultural Education Centres Program page.

The regional offices coordinates can be found on the Regional Offices page.

 

First Nation Infrastructure Fund

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100010656/1533645154710

About: The First Nation Infrastructure Fund (FNIF) helps First Nation communities improve and increase public infrastructure to improve the quality of life and the environment for First Nation communities. The FNIF supports a wide range of infrastructure projects that are on reserve, Crown land or land set aside for the use and benefit of First Nations. The FNIF targets infrastructure categories with long-standing community needs. Off-reserve projects can be considered if they are cost-shared with non-First Nation partners, such as nearby municipalities or other Indigenous partners.

Qualification: First Nation communities can apply through their First Nation Infrastructure Investment Plan.

The First Nations Infrastructure Investment Plan (FNIIP) helps Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) assess infrastructure needs and strategically plan infrastructure investments in First Nation communities across Canada. It supports healthy and safe First Nation communities, and the economic success of First Nations.

Each year, the National FNIIP is developed based on infrastructure investment plans at the community and regional level. The deadline for a First Nation to submit a community-level infrastructure investment plan to a regional office is September 30 of each year.

Investments are prioritized through the National Priority Ranking Framework, a planning tool that helps direct funding to the highest priorities using a consistent and transparent process across all regions. Higher-ranked projects are placed in earlier years of the plan, while lower-ranked projects are placed in later years. The amount of money planned under FNIIP varies from year-to-year because of time-limited, targeted funding programs. FNIIP is not a funding program but rather a planning tool for managing investments in First Nation infrastructure.

Deadline: fall (September 30th) of each year

How to apply: There is no need to apply. Projects are identified, reviewed and selected by INAC, based on the First Nation Infrastructure Investment Plans.

 

First Nation Student Success Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100033703/1531320860859

About: The FNSSP supports activities that increase students’ achievement levels in reading and writing (literacy), mathematics (numeracy) and encourage students to remain in school (student retention).

Activities funded through this program are required to include three interrelated components:

  • school success plans that set out goals, activities and targets for improving student achievement levels in the three priority levels (literacy, numeracy and student retention)
  • student learning assessments that support the school success planning process. Schools participate in their respective provincial standard testing process. Assessment results should be used to identify areas for improvement
  • performance measurement systems for schools to assess, report and take steps to accelerate progress made by students and schools. It allows schools to set targets, monitor results and report to parents and communities on how students are doing

Qualification: Regional First Nations organizations that currently provide, as a key function, elementary and secondary school support for a defined group of band-operated First Nations schools.

Deadline: The deadline to submit a proposal for 2018-2019 was December 13, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time.

How to apply:

The template to submit a proposal for the FNSSP is available through the ISC Service Portal or your regional office. If you do not have access to the portal, please contact your regional office. Only complete electronic proposals will be considered.

More detailed information about the application process, eligible activities, eligible recipients, selection criteria and the monitoring process can be found in:

Along with the completed proposal application form, applicants must also submit commitment/community support letters.

Only complete proposals will be considered for assessment.

First Nation Student Success Program Proposal (PAW# 1775521)

PDF Data Field List (IN PROGRESS)

 

First Nations and Inuit Skills Link Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100033627/1533125289674

About: The First Nations and Inuit Skills Link Program supports activities that assist youth in acquiring the essential skills that will help them gain employment, function well in the workplace, and learn about job and career options. Activities may include career promotion, science and technology activities, co-operative education placements and internships and mentored work placements.

Qualification:

  • First Nations and Inuit governments and organizations
  • First Nations schools or federal schools on reserve
  • not-for-profit organizations
  • private sector employers

Deadline: February 15, 2019

How to apply:

Proposals must:

  • fall within the program guidelines
  • be gender-balanced
  • outline the activities that support any or all of the program objectives
  • demonstrate that activities will provide assistance only to eligible participants
  • provide an estimate of eligible costs to be incurred, including those assumed by partners
  • outline the results to be achieved by the project

For First Nations and Inuit communities, governments and organizations:

  • Recipients who have access to the ISC Services Portalcan access the proposal form by opening a session on the portal.
  • Applicants who have access to the ISC Services Portal should use the electronic form by opening a session on the portal.
  • If you do not have access to the portal, contact your ISC regional office.

For more information, e-mail aadnc.education-education.aandc@canada.ca or call 1-800-567-9604.

First Nations organizations in British Columbia must apply through the First Nations Education Steering Committee.

For not-for-profit organizations and private sector employers:

 

First Nations and Inuit Summer Work Experience Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100033610/1533125433575

About: Projects under the First Nations and Inuit Summer Work Experience Program allow youth to learn about career options and earn an income that may contribute to university or college education.

Successful proposals:

  • include plans to offer wage subsidies to private sector and non-profit employers so they may hire eligible First Nations and Inuit youth
  • help First Nations and Inuit secondary and post-secondary students obtain summer employment and prepare for entry into the labour market
  • enable First Nations and Inuit youth to earn wages

Qualification:

  • First Nations and Inuit communities
  • First Nations and Inuit governments
  • First Nations and Inuit organizations
  • not-for-profit associations
  • private sector employers

Proposals must provide summer employment for First Nations and Inuit secondary and post-secondary students aged 15 to 30 who are ordinarily resident on reserve, in recognized communities, or on community lands.

Ordinarily resident on reserve means that eligible youth live on reserve, do not maintain a primary residence off reserve, and may be temporarily off-reserve for the primary purpose of seeking education.

Successful recipients can offer employment opportunities for youth directly, or may then enter into agreements with private sector and non-profit sector employers to access employment opportunities for youth.

Deadline: The deadline to submit a proposal is February 15, 2019 at 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time.

How to apply:

Applicants must submit detailed proposals for the activities to be undertaken over the course of the agreement.

Proposals must:

  • follow program guidelines
  • be gender-balanced
  • outline the activities that support the program’s objectives
  • demonstrate that the project will provide assistance only to eligible participants
  • provide an estimate of related costs, including those costs shared with partners
  • outline the results to be achieved by the project

The proposed placement must provide a minimum of 80 hours of work per participant.

Recipients who have access to the Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) Services Portal can access the proposal form by opening a session on the portal. If you do not have access to the portal, contact your regional office.

For more information:

Proposals are reviewed and approved by ISC.

First Nations organizations in British Columbia must apply through the First Nations Education Steering Committee

 

 

 

First Nations Child and Family Services Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100035204/1533307858805

About:

ISC provides funding to First Nations child and family services agencies, which are established, managed and controlled by First Nations and delegated by provincial authorities to provide prevention and protection services. In areas where these agencies do not exist, ISC funds services provided by the provinces and Yukon but does not deliver child and family services. These services are provided in accordance with the legislation and standards of the province or territory of residence. Funding for child and family services in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories is provided by the Department of Finance Canada through transfer payment agreements with the territorial governments, which make up a portion of their annual budgets. These governments decide how and where to spend the funds.

ISC uses a prevention-based funding model to support early intervention and alternatives to traditional institutional care and foster care, such as the placement of children with family members in a community setting.

The program provides 4 streams of funding:

  • Operations: core and operational funding for protection services (such as salaries and overhead)
  • Prevention: resources for enhanced prevention services
  • Maintenance: direct costs of placing First Nations children into temporary or permanent care out of the parental home (such as foster care rates and group home rates)
  • Community well-being and jurisdiction initiative: this new funding stream from Budget 2018 supports First Nations communities to lead the development and delivery of prevention services and to assert greater control over the well-being of their children and families

Qualification:

There is no application process. The following service delivery providers are eligible to receive funding through this program:

  • provincially delegated First Nations child and family services agencies
  • provincially delegated tribal councils
  • provincially delegated First Nations bands
  • provinces and Yukon

Deadline: N/A

How to apply:

Applications are not required for this program. Funding is provided through agreements signed directly with:

  • First Nations child and family services agencies
  • tribal councils
  • First Nations bands
  • provinces
  • Yukon
  • First Nations communities or other authorities

First Nations Land Management Regime

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1327090675492/1327090738973

About:

In 1991, a group of First Nation Chiefs approached the Government of Canada with a proposal to opt out of 32 provisions in the Indian Act on land and resources. As a result of this proposal, the Framework Agreement on First Nation Land Management was negotiated by 14 First Nations and Canada in 1996, and later ratified in 1999 by the First Nations Land Management Act. The Framework Agreement led to the establishment of the Lands Advisory Board and Resource Center to assist the 14 First Nations in implementing their own land management. Under First Nations Land Management (FNLM), land administration is transferred to First Nations once their land codes come into effect. This includes the authority to enact laws with respect to land, the environment, and resources. Once a First Nation has joined FNLM, it is able to receive two types of funding:

  • developmental funding for developing a land code, negotiating an individual agreement and holding a ratification vote
  • on-going operational funding for managing land, natural resources and environment, as determined by a formula and set out in the individual agreement.

First Nations operating within FNLM are not able to return to Indian Act land management.

As of January 2016, 95 First Nations have entered FNLM and are either developing or operating under their own land codes.

Qualification: Any First Nation with lands reserved for Indians within the meaning of section 91(24) of the Constitution Act of 1867 can apply.

Deadline: N/A, applications are reviewed on an ongoing basis

How to apply:

  1. The First Nation submits a Band Council Resolution to the regional INAC officeor to the Lands Advisory Board and Resource Centre, expressing interest in joining FNLM.
  2. The First Nation completes and submits an Assessment Questionnaire to the regional office.
  3. INAC reviews applications and identifies successful candidates with the help of the Lands Advisory Board Resource Center. If a First Nation is successful, INAC makes a recommendation to the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs that the First Nation be added to the Framework Agreement on First Nation Land Management through an adhesion document.
  4. Once both the Minister and the First Nation have signed the adhesion document, the First Nation is added to the Schedule of the First Nations Land Management Act.
  5. The First Nation then enters the developmental phase by signing an implementation document. The implementation document outlines developmental activities such as drafting a land code, negotiating an individual agreement with Canada, holding community consultations, and a ratification vote.
  6. The First Nation community approves the land code and individual agreement by a ratification vote.
  7. Once a land code and individual agreement have been approved by the First Nation membership, the Minister will sign the individual agreement, transferring the control and administration of the First Nation’s land and resources over to the First Nation. The 32 sections of the Indian Act dealing with land, resources and environment no longer apply to that First Nation.

Once the land code is in effect, the First Nation is considered operational under First Nations Land Management and has management authority and law-making powers over its reserve lands.

At the request of the First Nation, the Lands Advisory Board and Resource Center assists First Nations in implementing changes to their land and resource management. Natural Resources Canada provides a description of the lands that will come under the management of a community’s land code.

For a detailed description of FNLM, see A Guide for First Nations in the First Nations Land Management Regime.

 

High-Cost Special Education Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100033697/1531317695726

About:

ISC supports First Nations students’ special education needs through two programs:

  1. The Elementary and Secondary Education Programfunds special education services for First Nations students identified as having mild to moderate learning disabilities. Funding is provided for programming, remedial instruction, clinical services and resource teacher staffing.
  2. The High-Cost Special Education Program funds band-operated schools for high-cost special education students assessed with moderate to profound learning disabilities. The program funding is student-specific and determined by a formula based on individual student requirements. It is used for direct service support in the form of personnel, adaptive materials and resource services.

The High-Cost Special Education Program consists of direct and indirect services. Direct services represent at least 75% of the available funding. These include a number of classroom and school-based services related to the education and support of students with high-cost special needs. Examples include:

  • costs associated with the:
    • acquisition of professional assessments
    • completion of student assessments
    • educational psychological, speech and language services
    • counseling and social services
    • Elder, mentoring and cultural services
    • occupational therapy and physical therapy services
    • instructional and resource materials
    • assistive technologies and equipment purchases
  • salaries and benefits for:
    • Special Education teachers
    • individual teacher aides and para-professional workers

Indirect services represent up to 25% of total High-Cost Special Education Program funding. Funding is provided to eligible First Nations recipients for the development of special education programs and services on the understanding that each First Nations student with special education needs is unique. Each student requires a customized program to meet their individual needs in order to best support their success. Examples include:

  • professional development and training for teachers and teachers’ aides
  • information services for parents
  • research and development and adaptation of special education programs and materials that are culturally appropriate for First Nations students
  • coordination of special education programming with other community programs, social and health services
  • costs associated with:
    • administrative support
    • accommodations involving changes in how a student accesses information, and demonstrated learning, which can include changes in the method of instruction, curriculum and the environments
    • transportation, such as transportation of severely disabled special day class pupils and orthopedically impaired pupils who require a vehicle with a wheelchair lift

Qualification: Band councils, federal schools, provincial ministries of education, provincial school boards or districts, private education institutions and organizations designated by band councils.

Deadline: as of 2018, the deadline was May 15th, 2018

How to apply:

Proposals are accepted through an annual call for proposals.

Eligible recipients must submit detailed requests for all the high-cost special education activities to be undertaken during the school year. Requests must clearly state how the proposed activities will further the objectives of the program and respond to students’ high-cost special education needs and the expected results of the program.

The programs or services that are to be implemented or maintained during the school year must be comparable to the high-cost special educational programs and services that are currently offered by the provincial schools.

When submitting a request, please follow the High-Cost Special Education Program: National Program Guidelines 2018-2019.

All proposals will be assessed by ISC regional offices using these criteria.

For more information on submitting a request, please contact ISC by email at aadnc.education-education.aandc@canada.ca or by telephone at 1-800-567-9604 and ask to speak to an Education officer.

 

Housing Subsidy Program in British Columbia

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1460572593683/1460572628631

About:

In British Columbia region, the key to accessing housing subsidies for both short and long-term housing goals is planning. Housing is planned and delivered in a continuous cycle, where each phase is essential to the next. Funding support in British Columbia region is also available through the New Approach for Housing Support. Both programs are part of INAC’s support for First Nations on-reserve housing, but not part of the national First Nations On-Reserve Housing Program which does not effectively support many of the smaller First Nations in British Columbia.

Housing subsidy amounts are based on the particular geographic and economic characteristics of a First Nation community. There are four different kinds of INAC subsidies available through the Housing Subsidy Program:

  1. New home construction or purchase subsidies provided for the construction or purchase of permanent homes located on-reserve.
  2. Renovation subsidies for renovations that extend the structural and/or mechanical life expectancy of the home by at least fifteen (15) years. The maximum allowable renovation subsidy is fifty per cent (50 per cent) of a new home subsidy
  3. Mould renovation subsidies assist First Nations with mold remediation which can be more complicated, and can be more costly than regular renovation. The maximum allowable subsidy for mould renovation is up to the full new home subsidy amount.
  4. Building inspection subsidies assist with building inspection costs incurred during construction, purchase or renovation

Qualification:

First Nation Councils, or delegated authorities such as tribal councils and other eligible organizations that have funding agreements with INAC BC Region.

 

Housing Managers are encouraged to contact INAC BC Region to confirm eligibility and current subsidy amounts available for your community.

Deadline: N/A, INAC accepts applications for housing subsidies year round.

How to apply: Housing Managers are encouraged to contact INAC BC Region to help identify how much funding is available for their community and which forms to use for their housing project.

 

Indigenous Representative Organizations – Basic organizational capacity funding

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1386699114943/1386699171938

About:

The Government of Canada values its relationship with Indigenous Representative Organizations (IROs) and recognizes the contribution they make on behalf of their members. To support the work of IROs across Canada, INAC provides both basic organizational capacity (core) funding and project funding.

INAC provides basic organizational capacity funding towards the core operations of national, provincial, territorial and/or regional representative Indigenous organizations and national Aboriginal women’s organizations representing the interests, issues, and concerns of their members.

Basic organizational capacity (core) funding supports items such as salaries, rent and utilities.

Qualification:

An organization is an eligible recipient if:

  1. it is a
    1. recognized representative Aboriginal organization at the national (e.g. the Assembly of First Nations, the Métis National Council) or the provincial/territorial or regional level (e.g. Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations, Council of Yukon First Nations, or Inuvialuit Regional Corporation); or,
    2. it is an autonomous, national Aboriginal women’s organization representing the interests of its respective First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Non-Status constituents;
  2. it is an Aboriginal organizations incorporated under Part II of the Canada Corporations Actor under corresponding provincial or territorial legislation;
  3. its membership is restricted to a defined or identifiable group of First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Non-Status communities and/or organizations;
  4. it is mandated, by its members, to represent or advocate for the interests of those members; and
  5. it is not in receipt of any other core funding from any other federal department, including DIAND/OFI, for the purpose of maintaining a basic organizational capacity to represent or advocate for the interests of its members.

Funding under this authority supports basic organizational capacity of organizations mandated by Aboriginal peoples to represent them.

Deadlines: N/A

How to apply:

  1. Introduction

The purpose of this contributions program is to provide support towards the core operations of national, provincial, territorial and/or regional representative Aboriginal organizations and national women’s organizations representing the interest, issues, and concerns of their members.

These terms and conditions are specifically targeted to Aboriginal people.

  1. Legal and Policy Authority

Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act, R.S.C. 1985 c. I-6, s. 4;

Order dated July 2004 authorizing the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development to Act as Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians.

  1. Purpose, Objectives and Expected Results

This contribution authority furthers the departmental objective of ensuring that Aboriginal perspectives are reflected in the development of government policies and programs and supports all strategic outcomes of the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development.

 

i.e. Improving the quality of life and fostering self-reliance for First Nations, Inuit and Métis and Non-Status Indians by supporting the strategic outcome of good governance and effective institutions for Aboriginal peoples, built on co-operative relationships.

Funding under this authority supports co-operative relationships with Aboriginal peoples by providing basic organizational capacity to organizations mandated by Aboriginal peoples to represent them. Providing basic organizational capacity enables these organizations to be effective voices for their members and represent the interest of their respective communities. Funding provided under this authority is intended to have the following outcomes:

  • Core organizational capacity to make Aboriginal organizations capable of contributing and participating in government policy and program development;
  • Better informed representative Aboriginal organizations, their members, and elected officials;
  • Identification and agreement among members on priorities for action and approaches to issues;
  • Input to legislation, policies and programs so that they are more reflective of Aboriginal perspectives;
  • Increase members’ understanding, acceptance and support for the government’s Aboriginal policies; and
  • Improvements in the relations between Aboriginal peoples and the federal government.

In the Program Activity Architecture, this authority is listed under: The Government / Governance and Institutions of Government and Aboriginal Rights and Interests.

  1. Eligibility
  2. Type and Nature of Eligible Expenditures

Eligible expenditures include, but are not limited to: staff salaries, travel costs, accommodation costs, professional services, meeting/workshop cost, communications and office overhead.

  1. Total Canadian Government Funding and Stacking Limits

Proposals for funding from each recipient shall address the requirement for the recipient to declare any and all prospective sources of funding for the program, inclusive of all federal, provincial, territorial or municipal governments (total government assistance) and other sources that is expected to be received. Annual financial reporting shall show all sources of funding received. Provision for repayment shall be included in the funding arrangements. Maximum funding by DIAND/OFI and maximum total government assistance is 100% for eligible programs.

  1. Method for Determining the Amount of Funding

The method for determining the amount of funding is based on proposals received.

  1. Maximum Amounts Payable

The maximum amount payable to any one recipient in any year will not exceed $10 million.

  1. Basis on Which Payments will be Made

Payments are made based on a cash flow forecast from the recipient.

  1. Application Requirements and Assessment Criteria

In order for the department to consider entering into an agreement with a prospective recipient, the recipient will be required to provide:

  • proof, in an acceptable form, that the organization is incorporated and in good standing with the jurisdiction where it is incorporated;
  • a list of members, member communities or member organizations;
  • a statement, acceptable to the department (i.e. copies of resolutions from an annual or special meeting of members; copies of Band Council resolutions from members; copy of an annual general report), that the organization is mandated by its individual members, member communities or member organizations to undertake the activities it plans to undertake with the funds;
  • a description of how the organization will report to its individual members, member communities or member organizations on the use of the funds received, activities undertaken and results achieved;
  • a statement that the organization is not in receipt of basic organizational funding from any other federal government department, including DIAND/OFI, for the purpose of maintaining a basic organizational capacity as an advocacy organization;
  • a copy of the applicant’s most recent audited financial statements;
  • a proposal to, and reach agreement with, the department respecting the activities to be carried out, the objectives as they relate to the department’s mandate and priorities, the total cost of the activities, and the results to be achieved;
  • disclose/declare, in the proposal for funding, any and all prospective sources of funding for the program, inclusive of all federal, provincial or other government sources that is expected to be received; and
  • disclose the involvement of any former public servants who are under the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Service.

Continuing eligibility will depend on demonstrated performance.

 

Recipients who are former public office holders must respect and comply with the Conflict of Interest and Post-Employment Code for Public Office Holders and the Conflict of Interest and Post-Employment Code for the Public Service (2003). Recipients who are former public servants must respect and comply with the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Service. Where an applicant employs or has a major shareholder who is either a current or former (in the last twelve months) public office holder or public servant in the federal government, compliance with the Code(s) must be demonstrated.

Applicants shall provide assurance that, where lobbyists are utilized, they are registered in accordance with the Lobbyist Registration Act and that no contingency fee arrangement exists.

  1. Due Diligence and Reporting

The department has in place the appropriate systems, procedures and resources for ensuring due diligence in approving/verifying eligibility for the management and administration of the contributions.

  1. Official Languages

Where a program supports activities that may be delivered to members of either official language community, access to services from the recipient will be provided in both official languages where there is significant demand and Part IV of the Official Languages Act is applicable. In addition, the department will ensure that the design and the delivery of programs respect the obligations of the Government of Canada as set out in Part VII of the Official Languages Act.

  1. Intellectual Property

Where a contribution is provided for the development of material in which copyright subsists, conditions for shared rights will be set out in the funding agreement.

  1. Repayable Contributions

Provisions for repayable contributions do not apply. Any contributions made to private firms under these programs are not intended to generate profits or to increase the value of a business.

  1. Redistribution of Contributions

Where a recipient delegates authority or further distributes contribution funding to an agency or a third party (such as an authority, board, committee, or other entity authorized to act on behalf of the recipient), the recipient shall remain liable to the Department for the performance of its obligations under the funding agreement. Neither the objectives of the programs and services nor the expectations of transparent, fair and equitable services shall be compromised by any delegation or redistribution of contribution funding.

 

Recipients have full independence in the selection of such third parties and will not be acting as an agent of the government in making distributions.

Basic Organizational Capacity Contribution Program Funding Application (PAW# 1323247)

 

Indigenous Community-Based Climate Monitoring Program

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1509728370447/1509728402247

About: This program was developed in response to needs that the National Indigenous Organizations identified through engagement on the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. The program provides funding to support Indigenous communities in the development and implementation of community-based climate monitoring projects.

The goal of the program is to support Indigenous peoples in monitoring climate indicators, which will provide the data required to inform community adaptation actions. In addition, the data can help address climate data gaps within Canada and improve climate models and weather predictions.

Qualification:

  • Indigenous communities and organizations
  • First Nation band or tribal councils
  • Indigenous individuals

Eligible applicants can work with external partners such as:

  • other Indigenous communities
  • federal, provincial, territorial or regional governments
  • non-governmental organizations
  • academic institutions
  • consultants

Deadline: As of 2018, the deadline for proposal submission was midnight Eastern Standard Time on Friday, February 16, 2018.

How to apply:

To apply for program funding, please follow the application process outlined below:

  1. Review the Funding Guidelines 2018-2019and the work plan and budget spreadsheets.
  2. Seek and confirm community support for your proposed project with a community support letter.
  3. Complete a 2 to 5 page project proposal as described in the Funding Guidelines 2018-2019, as well as the work plan(XLS Format) and budget (XLS Format) spreadsheets.
  4. Submit the project proposal, work plan and budget spreadsheets, and community support letter to surveillanceclimat-climatemonitoring.aandc@canada.ca.

Lands and Economic Development Services Program

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100033423/1100100033424

About:

Lands and natural resources are among the most valuable assets held by First Nations and Inuit communities, and their effective and sustainable use is critical for Indigenous economic development. As outlined in the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development (PDF – 25 pages, 1.43 Mb), the Government of Canada intends to unlock the full economic potential of Indigenous peoples, their communities and their businesses by promoting Indigenous partnerships with the provinces and territories and the private sector.

With this goal in mind, in April 2014, the Government of Canada combined five community-based economic and land management support programs into the Lands and Economic Development Services Program. This will help increase Indigenous participation in the economy through laws and programs, and allow communities greater control over land management.

The program, administered by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), offers different types of funding to help First Nations and Inuit communities address the following:

The Lands and Economic Development Services Program enables First Nations and Inuit communities to:

  • deliver economic development services, such as community economic development planning, capacity development initiatives and proposal development
  • assume greater control over reserve lands, resources and the environment on behalf of the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs and in accordance with the Indian Act
  • help build capacity to effectively manage their lands in accordance with the First Nations Land Management Act‘s various tools, such as land codes, individual agreements, land management systems and environmental agreements
  • provide support services that prevent contamination of reserve lands under INAC custodial responsibility

Priority is given to:

  • initiatives that:
    • strengthen land and environmental management, and economic development as a key function of a strong local government
    • support Indigenous participation in major resource development initiatives
    • support First Nations Land Management Regime readiness, or strategic economic development and associated land use planning
  • initiatives that promote on-reserve environmental management and pollution prevention, with an emphasis on waste management
  • additions to reserves, designations and surveys that support economic development

Funding is determined by:

  • level of risk involved
  • demonstrated need for federal funding
  • environmental benefits for First Nations and Inuit individuals, businesses or communities, such as improved waste management or rehabilitation of contaminated lands on reserves under INAC’s custodial responsibility

 

Nation Rebuilding Program

https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1530880050808/1530880135933

 

New Approach for Housing Support in British Columbia

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1460572397817/1460572439929

About:

NAHS in British Columbia provides a wider range of eligible activities and flexibility for First Nations than the Housing Subsidy Program. Both programs are part of INAC’s support for First Nations on-reserve housing, but not part of the national First Nations On-Reserve Housing Program which does not effectively support many of the smaller First Nations in British Columbia.

NAHS is delivered through the annual First Nations Infrastructure Investment Plan process.

NAHS has three streams:

  • Stream 1 provides funding to help First Nations establish a housing strategy that works for their community, including planning, policy development, and training/capacity building opportunities
  • Stream 2 provides funding for housing construction or renovation
  • Stream 3 provides funding for lot development and subsidies for new housing

BC First Nations can apply to NAHS and the Housing Subsidy Program.

Qualification:

First Nation councils, or delegated authorities (such as tribal councils and other eligible organizations) that have funding agreements with INAC.

First Nations that want to establish or update their housing policies or plans should first apply to Stream 1, and can apply to Stream 2 or 3 in following years.

Any First Nation in British Columbia can apply to Stream 1, even if they applied for funding from the existing Housing Subsidy Program. However, if a First Nation is approved for Stream 2 or 3 under NAHS, they are not eligible to apply to the Housing Subsidy Program during the period of the approved NAHS project.

Deadline: October 15th of each year

How to apply: Please contact INAC’s British Columbia office at 1-800-665-9320 or, if in Metro Vancouver, 604-775-5100 and ask to speak to your capital management officer.

 

New Paths for Education Program

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1460572397817/1460572439929

About:

With an annual budget of $50 million, New Paths funds a variety of school-based projects directly involving First Nations students, parents and caregivers, teachers and communities. Funds can also be provided to First Nations education authorities and regional education and management organizations to build capacity and develop governance for local schools. The level of funding for successful proposals is determined on a case-by-case basis, and depends overall on available funding both nationally and regionally.

Projects funded under New Paths are designed to produce long-term benefits that will improve education quality and academic achievement of First Nations students, including:

  • reduced teacher turnover
  • enhanced coordination and support of First Nations education programs and services
  • increased use and maintenance of First Nations languages
  • increased availability and use of culturally appropriate and relevant curricula
  • increased level of computer literacy
  • enhanced quality and quantity of data to monitor and improve academic progress
  • increased involvement of parents and communities in the education system
  • enhanced awareness of the importance of education to potential career paths

The specific objectives of the program are to:

  • strengthen First Nations education management and governance capacity by developing local and educational institutional capacity
  • improve the effectiveness of classroom instruction through curriculum and language development, improvements to instructional methods and school activities
  • support community and parental involvement in the education of children and youth
  • assist band-operated schools to recruit and retain qualified teachers and educators, and to provide them with professional development opportunities
  • enhance technical knowledge in schools

Qualification: Band councils, or organizations designated by band councils, may submit proposals for regular New Paths funding.

Deadline: as of 2018 for regular new paths funding was May 1st, 2018, eastern time, for innovation activities was May 15th, 2018.

How to apply:

Proposals for regular New Paths funding are accepted once a year through a call for proposals. You can apply for regional funding or if your project covers more than one region you can apply for national funding. The process and the forms are the same. A sample proposal form is available.

For the Innovation call, please consult Innovation activities to find out how to apply.

For regular New Paths funding at either the regional or national level, applicants must:

  • submit detailed electronic proposals for all projects to be funded
  • indicate in the form that you are applying for regional or national funding
  • show how your activity will fulfill at least one of the New Paths program’s objectives

If you have access to Indigenous Service Canada’s Services Portal:

  • use the electronic form by opening a session on the portal

If you do not have access to the portal

Applicants are strongly encouraged to closely review the New Paths for Education: National Program Guidelines 2018-2019  before submitting an application.

 

Post-Secondary Partnerships Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100033691/1531934968283

About:

This program is a competitive, proposal-driven process based on merit and focused on meeting labour market needs. It supports projects that deliver a program of study or develop new courses and programs tailored for First Nations and Inuit students.

Priority is given to project proposals that:

  • focus on the labour market, with specific outcomes and objectives
  • lead to high-demand jobs in the Canadian economy or within First Nations or Inuit communities (such as governance)
  • respond to the educational needs of First Nations and Inuit students
  • use innovative and efficient delivery methods to increase the availability of education in remote communities
  • have a plan towards financial self-sustainability
  • contain short duration, undergraduate level courses
  • include funding partners with a firm commitment to monetary participation

Qualification: Canadian post-secondary institutions and post-secondary education institutions affiliated with or operating in a formal partnership with a degree, diploma or certificate granting institution recognized by a province or territory can apply. In Quebec only, First Nations and their organizations, in partnership with eligible post-secondary institutions, are eligible recipients. In other provinces and territories, First Nations post-secondary institutions are encouraged to develop partnerships with eligible post-secondary institutions to enable them to access this funding and take advantage of best practices.

Deadline: 2018-2019 call for proposals is now closed, the deadline was February 23rd, 2018, eastern time.

How to apply:

Guideline: https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1450716869941/1531935661310

All funding for the PSPP is determined by a selection process and based on selection criteria. Annex 1 provides an Applicants Guide to the overall proposal assessment criteria.

Proposals will be assessed against the criteria set out below.

  • A statement of need for each specific project describing the background, the targeted student base, the type of program and area of study, context of the project, specific issues that will be addressed, and the drivers leading to the funding request. Items of special note include whether:
    • courses lead to high-demand job occupations (including health and education fields) in local, regional or national labour markets; or
    • proposals contribute to building human resources, business, and new professional capacity in Indigenous governments, communities, and service delivery institutions.
  • Responsiveness to the educational needs of First Nation and Inuit students, including evidence of Indigenous support for the project.
  • A clear project definition, including planned activities, expected outcomes and evidence of previous program success (where applicable).
  • The use of innovative and efficient delivery methods.
  • A proposed budget, detailed by activity.
  • The identification of other funding partners, the potential to lever other sources of financing or in-kind support.
  • A transition plan for self-sufficiency setting out how and when the proposed program will migrate to the mainstream activities within the regular operations of the post-secondary institution.
  • Funding recipients must charge students regular tuition fees and apply tuition as a source of funds for the project, and present the information in the “Partners” section of the proposal.
  • Short duration diploma and certificate programs are encouraged. Undergraduate instruction (including college-level certificates and diplomas) will be given priority. The minimum program duration will be defined as the completion of courses leading towards a certificate or diploma as determined by post-secondary institutions.

 

Post-Secondary Student Support Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100033682/1531933580211

About:

The program aims to improve the employability of First Nations and eligible Inuit students by providing them with funding to access education and skills development opportunities at the post-secondary level.

Eligible post-secondary levels include:

  • community college and CEGEP diploma or certificate programs
  • undergraduate programs
  • advanced or professional degree programs

The program is administered by the First Nation or the First Nations or Inuit designated organization that determines the funding and selection criteria in accordance with national guidelines. ISC provides funding for this program as part of core funding agreements with Indigenous governments and organizations.

Qualification: Treaty and Status First Nations post-secondary students who have resided in Canada for 12 consecutive months before the date of their application, and Inuit post-secondary students who have resided in Canada for 12 consecutive months before the date of their application, but who reside outside of their territory and are no longer eligible to be funded by their territory.

Deadline: Contact your local band office or the Inuit designated organization for post-secondary education funding for information on deadlines.

How to apply: First Nations and Inuit students who want to pursue post-secondary studies and access available funding programs should contact their local band office, Inuit designated organization for post-secondary education funding or ISC regional office.

 

Professional and Institutional Development Program

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100013815/1100100013816

About:

The Professional and Institutional Development Program funds projects that develop the capacity of communities to perform ten core functions of governance, such as:

  • leadership
  • membership
  • law-making
  • community involvement
  • external relations
  • planning and risk management
  • financial management
  • human resources management
  • information management/information technology
  • basic administration

Qualification:

  • First Nations
  • Tribal councils
  • Inuit communities

Deadline: contact funding service officer in your indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada regional office for the deadline in your region

How to apply:

Plans or proposals should be submitted by the organization that will manage the contribution funding.

Submit the completed plans or proposals to your regional office.

 

Reserve Lands and Environment Management Program

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1394718212831/1394718309861

About: The Lands and Economic Development Services Program provides targeted funding for lands and economic development support services to help communities achieve the objectives of the Program. This includes services that prevent the contamination of reserve lands and other lands under AANDC’s custodial responsibility. Eligible activities include:

  • land support for:
    • initiatives that support the development of land and resources under community control as well as access to opportunities from lands and resources not under community control;
    • initiatives that support compliance with the statutory provisions of the Indian Actand the processing of land management instruments under the Indian Act.
  • environmental management support for:
    • initiatives that enhance environmental awareness and support efforts towards pollution prevention;
    • initiatives that support environmental management best practices with land and community assets; and
    • initiatives to improve environmental regulatory compliance.

Qualification:

  • First Nation and Inuit communities and their governments, including Tribal Councils (Inuit communities are only eligible for the economic development services component)
  • Other persons performing delegated land management functions under Sections 53 and/or 60 of the Indian Acton behalf of First Nations

How to apply:

The Department will communicate the application requirements directly with applicants.

Required information may include:

  1. Full name, address, phone number, and description of the applicant.
  2. Information on the applicant’s financial situation.
  3. A description of the applicant’s management and organization capacity.
  4. A detailed description of the proposed project and activities to be undertaken.
  5. Relevant documentation related to any partnership arrangements and commitments.
  6. Timelines for the project.
  7. A cost forecast of the project and details of financing, including all sources of funding for the project.
  8. Anticipated economic benefits of the project, including expected outcomes and proposed performance measures.
  9. Any other information considered necessary by the Department.

In some cases, additional information may be required, such as:

  1. A strategic or business plan that addresses: use of funds; identification and justification of costs; management capacity; business organization; worker capacity; suppliers; provision for unexpected contingencies; products and services; marketing and sales plans; expected revenues, expenses and profit; and project design.
  2. Documentation indicating approval of the proposed project by the Aboriginal community or by the board of directors of the Aboriginal business or Aboriginal organization.
  3. Other corporate documents, such as articles of incorporation, by-laws and corporate policies, and procedures manuals.
  4. Documents supporting the interest in, or need or support for the project by Aboriginal individuals, Aboriginal communities, Aboriginal businesses or Aboriginal organizations.
  5. Documents supporting the need for the contribution to ensure that the project is realized.
  6. Documentation related to the business or project’s financing gap.
  7. Documentation related to the applicant’s legal structure, ownership and control.
  8. Demonstration of compliance with laws and regulations.
  9. Environmental effects and proposed mitigation measures.
  10. Land tenure requirements.
  11. For non-Aboriginal applicants, explanation of experience in dealing with Aboriginal clients.

Reserve Land and Environment Management Program (RLEMP) – First Nation Entry Request and Capacity Self-Assessment (PAW# 6978371)

Specific Claims Tribunal of Canada funding

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1529351013700/1529351035016

About: In 2008, the Specific Claims Tribunal Act received royal assent to create the Specific Claims Tribunal. Also included in the act are provisions to make funding available to First Nations who choose to file a specific claim with the tribunal.

About specific claim: Specific claim settlements help to right past wrongs, renew relationships and advance reconciliation in a way that respects the rights of First Nations and all Canadians. These claims (made by First Nations against the Government of Canada) relate to the administration of land and other First Nation assets and to the fulfilment of historic treaties and other agreements.

Qualification:

First Nations who have filed a specific claim with the Specific Claims Tribunal can apply for funding.

First Nations can file a specific claim with the tribunal in one of four situations, if:

  • a claim has not been accepted for negotiation by the Government of Canada
  • the Government of Canada fails to advise the First Nation within three years of filing its claim with the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs whether the claim will be accepted for negotiation
  • all parties agree
  • three years of negotiations do not result in a final settlement

Deadline: N/A, first nations may apply for funding as soon as their specific claim has been filed with the tribunal. However, it is recommended to apply by January 1st of each year as funding is limited.

How to apply:

Send your request for funding, including a budget of anticipated expenses and evidence that a claim has been referred to the tribunal, to:

Mail:
Director, Negotiation Support Directorate
Treaties and Aboriginal Government
Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs
10 rue Wellington, Room 8G1
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H4

Email: aadnc.unitedufinancement-nego-fundingunit-nego.aandc@canada.ca

Tribal Council Funding

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100013812/1100100013813

About: The program provides core operational funding to eligible tribal councils to enable them to develop the capacity of their member First Nations, as well as deliver programs and services as mandated by their member First Nations.  By using a consistent national approach to funding tribal councils, the program strengthens transparency and accountability of the tribal council to its member First Nations and ensures that resources are directed towards the more efficient and effective delivery of programs, services and capacity development.

Qualification:

Tribal councils are eligible if they have:

  • been clearly mandated to govern by band councils or an equivalent executive body of member First Nations

and

  • agreed to deliver services or capacity development to member First Nations, as designated by their member First Nations

Deadline: Contact your regional office

How to apply:

Tribal councils must apply annually using the Tribal Council Consolidated Application for Funding and the Tribal Council Consolidated Work Plan, which are available on the Proposals, Applications, Workplans web site. For a work plan to be accepted, the tribal council must plan on delivering services or developing capacity. Work plans consisting of only core administrative costs will not be accepted.

 

University and College Entrance Preparation Program

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100033688/1531936422341#cepp

About: This program aims to increase the number of First Nations and Inuit students with the academic level required for entrance into post-secondary programs.

Financial assistance may be provided for a maximum of one year of studies in the form of:

  • tuition support for part-time and full-time students that may include required fees, tuition and the cost of books and supplies required for courses
  • travel support for full-time students who must leave their permanent place of residence to attend their university or college entrance program
  • living allowances for full-time students to help cover the costs of food, shelter, local transportation and daycare

Qualification:

  • Treaty and Status First Nations post-secondary students who have resided in Canada for 12 consecutive months before the date of their application
  • Inuit post-secondary students who have resided in Canada for 12 consecutive months before the date of their application, but who reside outside their territory and are no longer eligible to be funded by their territory.

Students must also obtain a statement from the post-secondary institution offering their program of study confirming that:

  • the UCEPP will provide the student with the necessary courses to attain the academic level for university or college entrance
  • the student will be eligible to be accepted as a student of a regular university or college credit program upon successful completion of the UCEPP course of studies

Students in UCEPP must not have previously received financial support through Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (now ISC) for post-secondary programs.

Deadline: Please contact your local band office

How to apply: Students who want to pursue post-secondary studies and access available funding programs should contact their local band office, Inuit designated organization for post-secondary education funding or ISC regional office.

 

Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples

https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1471368138533/1536932634432

About: UPIP is designed to assist First Nations (status and non-status), Inuit and Métis living in or transitioning to urban centres. An urban centre is considered to be an urban area having a population of at least 1,000 people and a population density of no fewer than 400 people per square kilometre. Funding is also available for organizations that serve rural and northern areas that act as hubs for those living on reserves or in smaller northern settlements.

Qualification:

Recipients must be located in an urban centre

All initiatives and projects must advance the objectives of Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples

In addition, all non-Indigenous organizations, including municipal governments, health and education authorities and institutions, require demonstrated support from Indigenous organizations or Indigenous community groups to be eligible for funding.

Deadlines: N/A

How to apply:

Each stream of UPIP funding has its own application process.

Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples Funding Application (PAW# 9744235)